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Elizabeth Brusa is an associate in the Banking and Financial Services Practice Group focusing on small dollar lending, bankruptcy, and privacy, security and innovation. She is a Certified Information Privacy Professional for the U.S. Private-Sector (CIPP/US). Elizabeth counsels financial services clients on matters related to bankruptcy proceedings, bankruptcy fraud and abuse, and Chapter 11 filings.

Bradley’s Bankruptcy Basics: Automatic Stay and Discharge Injunction ViolationsThe automatic stay is immediately effective when a debtor files a petition for bankruptcy relief. The scope of the automatic stay is broad. The stay applies to all creditors and prohibits both formal and informal actions against the debtor and his property. And after the case is complete, the discharge injunction enjoins creditor action to

The automatic stay is a procedural tool in a bankruptcy case that effectively halts efforts by creditors to collect on a debtor’s outstanding obligations. As discussed in more detail in our prior post, immediately upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition, a “bankruptcy estate” is created, which includes virtually all assets of the debtor.

Bradley’s Bankruptcy Basics: The Automatic Stay and the “Why” Behind the Warnings: What Happens Once a Debtor Files for Bankruptcy?Many creditors have been warned of the need to halt collection efforts once they are put on notice that a debtor has filed for bankruptcy. However, the “why” behind this warning, mainly the automatic stay, is often misunderstood or disregarded. Since violations of the automatic stay can have serious ramifications, it is crucial that creditors

New Bankruptcy Rules to Take Effect December 1, 2021A few changes to the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure became effective on December 1, 2021. The most noteworthy change relates to Bankruptcy Rule 9036, which addresses notice and service by electronic transmission.

  • Bankruptcy Rule 2005 – Bankruptcy Rule 2005 generally deals with the apprehension and removal of a debtor to compel attendance at an

After (Another) Unusual Year, We’re Very Thankful and Wish You a Happy ThanksgivingNow that the pandemic’s “social distancing” is lessening, we hope you are all able to gather with friends and family this Thanksgiving. As we do the same, we wanted to count our blessings as we review the year. This year, we are thankful for being able to return to our offices, our favorite restaurants, and

CFPB Action Against Student Loan Originator Sends Message to Income Share Agreement IndustryOn September 7, 2021, the CFPB issued a consent order against Better Future Forward, Inc., and related entities (collectively, BFF), companies that provide financing for postsecondary education to students via income share agreements (ISAs). In this enforcement action, the CFPB found that BFF falsely represented that ISAs do not create debt and are not loans

One of the first things creditors ask after filing a proof of claim is, “when do I get paid?” As with so many other legal questions, the answer is, “it depends.” Although many different factors govern payment in a bankruptcy proceeding, there are four key elements to payment: proof, allowance priority, and timing.

Below, we

Florida Homestead Exemption Applies Only to U.S. Citizens and Permanent ResidentsA bankruptcy judge in the Middle District of Florida recently sustained a Chapter 7 trustee’s objection to a non-Florida resident debtor’s attempted claim of the Florida homestead exemption. Although the debtor had lived in her Florida home for more than 20 years, she was not a United States citizen or a permanent resident with a

Last March, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) made several changes to the Bankruptcy Code, including those changes discussed in more detail here. As it became clear that we would be dealing with COVID-19 for much longer than previously anticipated, Congress passed the Consolidated

Bankruptcy is primarily about “claims.” The debtor seeks to discharge personal liability on claims, while creditors seek payment on their claims. In basic terms, a bankruptcy “claim” is a right to payment. The claim does not need to be fixed, settled, undisputed, or due at the time the debtor files his bankruptcy petition. The official