CFPB Proposes Delay to Implementation of Its Debt Collection RulesYesterday, the CFPB issued a proposed rule that would extend implementation of both parts of its debt collection rule by 60 days — from November 30, 2021, to January 29, 2022. The debt collection rule, which we have discussed here in detail, addresses numerous topics related to debt collection, including debt collection call volume, restrictions on certain communication mediums under certain circumstances, a prohibition on bringing or threatening to bring legal action to collect time-barred debt, restrictions on certain forms of consumer credit reporting, and rules for electronic communications. The rule also contains various safe harbors.

The Bureau explains that “[s]ince the Debt Collection Final Rules were published, the global COVID-19 pandemic has continued to cause widespread societal disruption, with effects extending into 2021.” Thus, in light of the continuing pandemic, the CFPB “believes that extending the rules’ effective date by 60 days . . . may provide stakeholders with sufficient time for review and implementation.”

In addition to explaining its reasoning, the CFPB has requested stakeholder commentary on several questions. First, the Bureau requests comment on whether an extension is appropriate and, if so, whether 60 days is an appropriate amount of time for an extension. The Bureau has also requested comment about whether it should consider retaining November 30, 2021, as an effective date for some or all of the Debt Collection Rules’ safe harbor provisions. Notably, the CFPB singles out the potential “costs and benefits of permitting debt collectors to obtain a safe harbor for using the Bureau’s model validation notice as of November 30, 2021[.]” Comments are due 30 days after publication in the Federal Register.

For more information on what is in the final rule generally, as well as some deep-dive sessions into particular topics, please visit Bradley’s webinar series on the debt collection rule:

Webinar Recordings:

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Photo of Lee Gilley Lee Gilley

Lee Gilley represents financial institutions, including banks, mortgage companies, debt collectors, small dollar lenders, and payment systems providers (credit cards, debit cards, prepaid cards, mobile payments, etc.) in litigation and regulatory matters related to compliance with the Card Act, ECOA, EFTA, FCRA, FDCPA…

Lee Gilley represents financial institutions, including banks, mortgage companies, debt collectors, small dollar lenders, and payment systems providers (credit cards, debit cards, prepaid cards, mobile payments, etc.) in litigation and regulatory matters related to compliance with the Card Act, ECOA, EFTA, FCRA, FDCPA, GLBA, HPA, RESPA, TILA, TCPA, CFPB regulations, and numerous other state laws and regulations. Lee is a member of Bradley’s Banking and Financial Services Practice Group, as well as the firm’s Payments and Small Dollar & Unsecured Lending industry teams.

Photo of J. Riley Key J. Riley Key

Riley Key works with financial services clients across the country facing regulatory and enforcement challenges related to obligations imposed by the CFPB, as well as various other federal and state laws. Specifically, Riley helps clients navigate compliance with the Mortgage Servicing Final Rules…

Riley Key works with financial services clients across the country facing regulatory and enforcement challenges related to obligations imposed by the CFPB, as well as various other federal and state laws. Specifically, Riley helps clients navigate compliance with the Mortgage Servicing Final Rules in Regulations X and Z and the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure Rule, as well as a host of federal and state regulations, including TILA, RESPA, FDCPA, FCRA, and ECOA. View articles by Riley.

Photo of Jonathan R. Kolodziej Jonathan R. Kolodziej

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Photo of Christopher K. Friedman Christopher K. Friedman

Chris Friedman is a regulatory compliance attorney and litigator who focuses on helping consumer finance companies and small business lenders, as well as banks, fintech companies, and other participants in the financial services industry, address the challenges of operating in a highly regulated…

Chris Friedman is a regulatory compliance attorney and litigator who focuses on helping consumer finance companies and small business lenders, as well as banks, fintech companies, and other participants in the financial services industry, address the challenges of operating in a highly regulated sector. Chris focuses on both small business lenders and alternative business finance products and has helped non-bank small business lenders, banks who make small business loans, commercial credit counselors, lead generators, and others in the industry. He helps clients launch new products, conduct due diligence, engage in compliance reviews, evaluate litigation risk, and solve some of the unique legal problems faced by companies who work with small businesses. In that vein, Chris has written extensively about the upcoming rulemaking related to Dodd-Frank 1071, which will require data collection and reporting by companies making loans to certain small businesses.

Photo of Brian R. Epling Brian R. Epling

Brian Epling assists financial services clients, including small dollar lenders, auto finance companies, and mortgage servicers, with navigating regulatory compliance and litigation issues.

On the regulatory compliance side, Brian has assisted financial services clients with policies and procedures to comply with state and…

Brian Epling assists financial services clients, including small dollar lenders, auto finance companies, and mortgage servicers, with navigating regulatory compliance and litigation issues.

On the regulatory compliance side, Brian has assisted financial services clients with policies and procedures to comply with state and federal law and investor requirements. With respect to litigation, practicing in both Tennessee and Kentucky, Brian has successfully argued dispositive motions and appeals involving alleged violations of the Truth in Lending Act, Real Estate Procedures Act, and Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Additionally, he has represented auto finance companies in administrative matters against the state. View articles by Brian.